irritated cat

We do not recommend

First-time college students, as you head off to class, try to avoid these common transgressions against one’s own academic interests . . .

1. Don’t read the syllabus or directions for individual assignments. Be sure to read through your syllabus on day one, and keep it close at hand for future reference. Also, print and scrutinize your individual assignment directions.

Questions are usually welcome, but when you have a question, always read over what you’ve been given to see if you can figure out the answer yourself first.

2. Skip class (or don’t log in regularly for an online class). Sure, you have the freedom to skip class – but is that the smartest thing to do when class is designed to teach you the material? Answer: no. You’re severely shortchanging your education when you don’t attend class, and you’re likely to fall behind, get frustrated, and even drop the class if you miss much.

3. Come to class, but throughout class, text, browse on Facebook, chat with neighbors, etc. It’s great to come to class, but sitting there whilst multitasking or socializing probably isn’t going to help you. Even a once-a-week night class or lab isn’t, in truth, interminably long; so remember why you’re in school and concentrate on the moment, take notes, and soak up the learning (not to mention respect others in the room!).

4. Expect good grades as a “given.” To first-year students, college is frequently a shock in terms of its expectations and standards; if you’re dismayed at grasping this, you are in very good company. Of course, good grades in college are achievable; but keep in mind they’re reflections of performance on particular assignments for particular classes. They’re not reflections of you as a person or even, necessarily, of your academic abilities. Keep working to improve and learn, and above all don’t expect high marks for mediocre work – in other words, eschew the so-called “attitude of entitlement.”

5. Have your parents call the school to straighten out your issues. It’s a relatively recent phenomenon that puzzles professors and administrators: parents of adult children contact college faculty and staff to serve as students’ agents. This is generally seen as irritating and unnecessary: you, as a student, should take ownership of your education and all related responsibilities.

6. Complain straight to the Dean rather than going to your instructor when you get a grade you don’t like. This is not to say you should stay away from visiting professors and tutors in order to discuss and better understand class material. I’m talking about students who suddenly spring to life when they have a complaint (many times about a grade or about rigor of the class), and go straight to “the manager” instead of approaching their professors. This is counterproductive and only serves to annoy and waste time of everyone involved. That’s because the Chair or Dean is generally going to send you back to your instructor anyway. Expend your energy on learning the class material, not on complaining about how hard it is.

Now, students of course may have legitimate complaints about the course, such as when a professor habitually cancels class or does not give clear directions – but even in these cases, always, always approach the professor first if at all possible; and approach in a friendly way, establishing that you’re trying your best to learn and learning is your chief concern.

7. Cheat. Don’t plagiarize; don’t be academically dishonest. It’s wrong, plus penalties may include failing the assignment, failing the class, or being expelled from the school.

And finally, some words of encouragement: in general, although it’s probably true that some of your professors will be better than others at teaching and communicating, and some of your classes you’ll enjoy more than others, try to keep your head up and basically, act with dignity as you seek out learning. You always have options when you get stuck, such as visiting the instructor during office hours, using tutoring services, or forming study groups. Good luck!

Feel free to add other ways students act against their own interests – and solutions . . .

Image via mrg.bz / chelle

Advertisements