Star sunglasses

Starstruck?

The intriguing piece “Save Us from the Superstars” (published recently in Inside Higher Ed) contains one quote in particular that stood out to me:

Higher education has always had superstars. Big names are lured away for big salaries, only to have very limited contact with undergraduates and very little impact on the day-to-day lives of students.” (John Warner, writing in the Just Visiting blog)

This is relevant, of course, to the college decision-making process of prospective students – and to the difficult yet important question: “But how do I know where the best professors are?” I’ve addressed this before on this blog, here — and suggested an academic adviser is a good resource for that discussion.

The news is good for students overall on this issue, though — I would bet that at every college, no matter the level of prestige, cost, or degrees granted, excellent professors profess. As countless students have discovered, professorial brilliance does not necessarily correspond to teaching ability, or the ability to explain concepts clearly and to engage students. But neither does that mean that the most “highly valued” profs wouldn’t shine in the classroom. Nor does that mean that great assistance can’t be found in on-campus tutoring (I remember grad students helping me to grasp concepts I wasn’t getting from class and my own reading). And of course, many excellent profs are adjuncts (part-time employees) and may not even be listed on the university’s website.

In short, learning is a complex and highly individual process. It’s nice to think “the right professors” will inspire and thrill, making your job of learning all that much easier — and that may be the case at times; but regardless of who’s teaching, learning is work, and the healthiest way to think about your learning at college is to remember it’s your responsibility. If the professor doesn’t explain something clearly, use office hours; form a study group; go to a tutor; ask a librarian; read and re-read your material; search for study aids on the web . . . all these things are within your power, whether or not your learning style seems to “click” with a given prof.

Related on this site: “‘Here We Are Now, Entertain Us’: Edutainment’s Effectiveness”

Image via mrg.bz / Carool

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